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Global Journal of Fertility and Research

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Research Article PTZAID:GJFR-2-106

Evaluating the Association of Ovarian Reserve with Age in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Semih Zeki Uludag, Mahmut Tuncay Ozgun*, Mehmet Dolanbay, Ozguc Altun, Ercan Mustafa Aygen and Yılmaz Sahin

Objectives: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility. However, they sustained fertility at an advanced age. We aimed to evaluate ovarian reserve of the PCOS patients of advanced age and the control groups.

Material and Methods: A total of 41 patients with PCOS and 28 normo-ovulatory women were included in the study. All subjects were aged 35–42 years. The 2003 Rotterdam criteria were referred, which diagnose PCOS in women possessing two or more of the following criteria: oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea; clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism; and polycystic ovaries on ultrasonography. Other possible endocrine disorders were excluded. During the early follicular phase of spontaneous or progestin-induced menses blood samples were collected and antral follicles and ovarian volume were calculated using transvaginal ultrasonographic examinations.

Results: The serum anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, the mean ovarian volume (MOV) and antral follicle count (AFC) were significantly higher in the PCOS group than in the control group (p<0.05). Moreover, the AMH levels revealed a significant positive correlation with AFC values, (r=0.74, p=0.001) and negative correlation with the serum follicle-stimulating hormone FSH levels (r=-0.37, p=0.001).

Conclusion: Ovarian reserve can be preserved better in women with PCOS than in normo-ovulatory women of similar age. Among the tests for ovarian reserve, the AMH levels in the early follicular phase and MOV correlate best with AFC values.

Published on: Feb 28, 2017 Pages: 4-8

Full Text PDF Full Text HTML DOI: 10.17352/gjfr.000006

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