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Clinical Group

Open Journal of Trauma

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Research Article PTZAID: OJT-1-105

Grade V Renal Injury – Short and Long Term Outcome

Rajendra B Nerli*, Vikas Sharma, Basavaraj M Kajagar, Neeraj S Dixit and Nitin D Pingale

Introduction: Over the last few decades, non- operative management (NOM) has become increasingly popular, especially for low-grade (I-III) blunt renal injuries.The published evidence is unclear about the  role of NOM for higher grades (IV and V). We took up this study to report our short and long-term outcomes following initial nonoperative management in patients sustaining a grade 5 renal injury secondary to blunt trauma.

Materials and Methods: The charts of all patients who presented to our institution with blunt renal trauma between Jan 2000 and Dec 2014 and had grade V renal injury were identifed and analyzed.

Results: 114 patients were identified, with grade V renal injury following blunt trauma (BRI). 9/114 patients (7.89%) died following resuscitation in the casualty and emergency services, 4 (3.50%) of whom had  deaths that were related to the kidney injury. 36 (34.28%) underwent early surgical exploration (13 – 42 hours) for various indications and nephrectomy was performed in 21 (58.33%). Eight patients who were  on non-operative management needed delayed surgical exploration of which two patients (25%)  presenting with massive secondary bleeding needed nephrectomy for control of the bleeding.

Conclusions: 41.9% of patients with grade V renal injury needed surgical exploration of which 34.28%  underwent early, whereas 7.61% underwent delayed exploration. 58.33% of patients undergoing early exploration and 25% of patients undergoing delayed exploration ended up with nephrectomy. Non operative management would be safe in the majority of patients with grade V renal injuries secondary to blunt trauma.

Published on: Mar 13, 2017 Pages: 20-25

Full Text PDF Full Text HTML DOI: 10.17352/ojt.000005

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